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Chrysanthemum plant named Cherry Emily
PP9077 Chrysanthemum plant named Cherry Emily
Patent Drawings:Drawing: PP9077-3    
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Inventor: VandenBerg
Date Issued: March 14, 1995
Application: 08/151,974
Filed: November 15, 1993
Inventors: VandenBerg; Cornelis P. (Salinas, CA)
Assignee: Yoder Brothers, Inc. (Barberton, OH)
Primary Examiner: Locker; Howard J.
Assistant Examiner:
Attorney Or Agent: Foley & Lardner
U.S. Class: PLT/293
Field Of Search: Plt/76; Plt/81; Plt/82; Plt/82.4; Plt/82.5
International Class:
U.S Patent Documents: 4616099
Foreign Patent Documents:
Other References: Chan, 1966 "Chrysanthemum and rose mutations induced by X-rays", Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. Proc., pp. 613-620..
Broertjes, 1966, "Mutation breeding of Chrysanthemums", Euphytica, 15:156-162..
Dowrick, et al., 1966 "The induction of mutations in Chrysanthemum using X-and gamma radiation", Euphytica, 15:204-210..
Broertjes et al., 1980 "A mutant of a . . . Irradiation of progressive radiation-induced mutants in a mutation breeding programme with Chrysanthemum morifolium", Euphytica, 29:526-530..
Gosling, ed., 1979, "The Chrysanthemum Manual-6th edition", The National Chrysanthemum Society, London, Essex Telegraph Press, Ltd., pp. 329-336..
Broertjes, et al., 1978, "Application of Mutation Breeding Methods In The Improvement of Vegetatively Propagated Crops"m, Elsevier Sci. pub. Co., New York, pp. 162-175..
Searle, et al., 1968, "Chrysanthemums The Year Round", Blanford Press, London, pp. 27-29, 320-327..









Abstract: A Chrysanthemum plant named Cheery Emily particularly characterized by its flat capitulum form; decorative capitulum type with many disc florets, especially in spring flowerings; mauve-red ray floret color, with slightly darker center of the flower; diameter across face of capitulum of 57 to 70 mm when fully opened; branching pattern is spreading and prolific, with 8 to 9 breaks after pinch when grown outside under natural daylength in fall flowerings, and 6 to 7 breaks after pinch when grown in 10 cm pots for spring flowerings; natural season flower date of August 13 to 19 when planting rooted cuttings on June 21 to 23 in Salinas, Calif., and of September 15 when planting rooted cuttings June 11 in Hightstown, N.J.; flowering response of 45 to 49 days after rooting in no light/no shade programs in spring; plant height of 38 cm when grown in fall under natural daylength with no growth regulators in New Jersey, 23 to 25 cm when grown in fall under natural daylength in california, and 23 to 25 cm when grown in 10 cm pots in spring with 0 to 2 applications of 2500 ppm B-9 SP; and durable, uniform performance.
Claim: I claim:

1. A new and distinct Chrysanthemum plant named Cheery Emily, as described and illustrated.
Description: The present invention comprises anew and distinct cultivar of Chrysanthemum, botanically known as Dendranthema grandiflora, and referred to by the cultivar name Cheery Emily.

Cheery Emily, identified as 8476 (87-284A01), is a product of a mutation induction program. The new cultivar was discovered and selected by Cornelis P. VandenBerg on Jun. 22, 1990, in a controlled environment in Salinas, Calif. as oneflowering plant within a flowering block established as rooted cuttings from stock palnts which had been exposed as unrooted cuttings to an X-ray source of 2000 rads in Fort Myers, Fla. on Nov. 30, 1989. The irradiated parent cultivar was the cultivaridentified as Emily, disclosed in U.S. Plant Pat. No. 7,754, and described as a garden mum with a flat decorative flower with many disc florets; light pink ray floret color, with darker center of the flower; diameter across face of capitulum of 57 to70 mm when fully opened; spreading and prolific branching pattern, with 8 to 9 breaks after pinch when grown outside under natural daylength in fall flowerings, and 6 to 7 breaks after pinch when grown in 10 cm pots for spring flowerings; natural seasonflowering date of August 13 to 25 when planting rooted cuttings June 21 to 23 in Salinas, Calif., and September 16 to 29 when planting rooted cuttings June 15 to June 18 in Hightstown, N.J.; flowering response of 45 to 48 days after rooting in nolight/no shade programs in spring; plant height of 36 to 38 cm when grown in fall under natural daylength with no growth regulators in New Jersey, of 23 to 25 cm when grown in fall under natural daylenth with no growth regulators in California, and of 20to 25 cm when grown in 10 cm pots in spring with 0 to 2 applications of 2500 ppm B-9 SP. The ranges of measurements or Emily given here are somewhat wider than the measurements described in the plant patent for Emily. This is based on continuingflowering trials of Emily after filing the plant patent application for Emily.

The irradiation program resulting in Cheery Emily had as its primary objective the expansion of color ranges of the parent cultivar Emily. The irradiation program comprised irradiating cuttings of the parent cultivar at irradiation levels of1750 and 2000 rads. A total of 1073 cuttings harvested from a total of 150 irradiated plants were planted on Apr. 23 and 16, 1990, respectively. Of these, 17 initial selections were made, which selections were then revegetated and reflowered. Threeconsecutive flowerings resulted in discarding 12 of the original 17 selections on Mar. 5, 1991. The remaining five selections were maintained as PIs (Possible Introductions) and further trailed in Salinas, Calif., Hightstown, N.J. and Leamington,Ontario, Canada, utimately resulting in the decision to discardcode 8492 on Oct, 1, 1992, to discard code 8484 on Nov. 4, 1992 and to introduce selection 8476 as Cherry Emily, selection 8484 as Blushing Emily and selection 8486 as Harvest Emily. Blushing Emily and Harvest Emily are disclosed in pending application Ser. Nos. 08/151,975 and 08/151,973, respectively.

The first act of asexual reproduction of Cheery Emily was accomplished when vegetative cuttings were taken from the initial selection in August 1990 in a controlled environment in Salinas, Calif., by technicians working under supervision ofCornelis P. VandenBerg.

Horticultural examination of controlled flowerings of successive plantings has shown that the unique combination of characteristics as herein disclosed for Cherry Emily are firmly fixed and are retained through successive generations of asexualreproduction.

Cheery Emily has not been observed under all possible environmental conditions. The phenotype may vary slignificantly with variations in environment such as temperature, light intensity and daylength, without, however, any variation in genotype.

The following observations, measurements and comparisons describe plants grown in controlled open areas in Salinas, Calif., and in Hightstown, N.J. Rooted cuttings were established in soil and maintained outdoors under the natural temperatureand daylength prevailing during June through October. Spring flowerings were conducted in Salinas, Calif. under greenhouse conditions which approximate those generally used in commercial greenhouse practice or small pot spring garden mum production.

The following traits have been repeatedly observed and are determined to be basic characteristics of Cheery Emily, which, in combination, distinguish this Chrysanthemum as a new and distinct cultivar;

1. Flat capitulum form.

2. Decorative capitulum type with may disc florets, especially in spring flowerings.

3. Mauve-red ray floret color, with slightly darker center of the flower.

4. Diameter across face of capitulum of 57 to 70 mm when fully opened.

5. Branching pattern is spreading and prolific, with 8 to 9 breaks after pinch when grown outside under natural daylength in fall flowerings, and 6 to 7 breaks after pinch when grown in 10 cm pots for spring flowerings.

6. Natural season flower date of August 13 to 19 when planting rooted cuttings on June 21 to 23 in Salinas, Calif., and of September 15 when planting rooted cuttings June 11 in Hightstown, N.J.

7. Flowering response of 45 to 49 days after rooting in no light/no shade programs in spring.

8. Plant height of 38 cm when grown in fall under natural daylength with no growth regulators in New Jersey, 23 to 25 cm when grown in fall under natural daylength in California, and 23 to 25 cm when grown in 10 cm pots in spring with 0 to 2applications of 2500 ppm B-9 SP.

9. Durable, uniform performance.

The accompanying photographic drawing is a color photograph of Cheery Emily grown as a pinched garden mum under natural season outside conditions in Salinas, Calif., with the colors being as nearly trueas possible with ilustrations of this type. Plants were grown outside and dug and transplanted into 15 cm bulb pans at flowering time for photography purposes.

Of the commercial cultivars known to the inventor, the most similar in comparison toCheery Emily is the parent cultivar Emily. In the above description of Cheery Emily the ranges of values for Cheery Emily are much marrower than the ranges of values given for Emily. This is based on the fact that Emily was flowered over many years,while Cheery Emily was flowered over a period of only one and a half years. most traits of Cheery Emily are similar to those of Emily, except for the ray floret color. The ray floret color of Cheery Emily is mauve-red, with a darker center of theflower, while the ray floret color of emily is light pink with a darker center of the flower.

In the following description color references are made to The Royal Horticultural Society Colour Chart. The color values were determined on plant material grown as a pinched garden mum grown under natural season outside conditions in Salinas,Calif. on Aug. 16, 1993.

Classification:

Botanical.--Dendranthema gradiflora cv Cheery Emily.

Commercial.--Flat decorative spray pot mum and garden mum.

INFLORESCENCE

A. Capitulum:

Form.--Flat

Type.--Decorative, with many disc florets, especially in spring flowerings.

Diameter across face.--57 to 70 mm when fully opened.

B. Corolla of ray florets:

Color (general tonality from a distance of three meters).--mauve-red with slightly darker center of the flower.

Color (upper surface).--Between 180C and 181B to 181C; center of capitulum is slightly darker, between 180B and 181B.

Color (under surface).--179C, longitudinal center of the petals strongly overlaid with 180B.

Shape.--Flat, straight, rounded petal tip.

C. Corolla of disc florets:

Color (mature).--6B.

Color (immature).--2A, overlaid with 144B.

D. reproductive organs:

Androecium.--Present on disc florets only, moderate pollen.

Gynoecium.--Present on both ray and disc florets.

PLANT

A. General Appearance:

Height.--38 cm when grown in fall under natural daylength with no growth regulators in New Jersey, 23 to 25 cm when grown in fall under natural daylength in California, and 23 to 25 cm when rown in 10 cm pots in spring with 0 to 2 applications of2500 ppm B-9 SP.

Branching pattern.--Spreading and prolific, with 8 to 9 breaks after pinch when grown outside under natural daylength in fall flowerings, and 6 to 7 breaks after inch when grown in 10 cm pots for spring flowerings.

B. Foliage:

Color (upper surface).--147A.

Color (under surface).--147B.

Shape.--Relatively small, shallow lobes, and slightly serrated.

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