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Method for depositing tungsten film having low resistivity, low roughness and high reflectivity
8501620 Method for depositing tungsten film having low resistivity, low roughness and high reflectivity
Patent Drawings:

Inventor: Chandrashekar, et al.
Date Issued: August 6, 2013
Application:
Filed:
Inventors:
Assignee:
Primary Examiner: Smith; Zandra
Assistant Examiner: Duong; Khanh
Attorney Or Agent: Weaver Austin Villeneuve & Sampson LLP
U.S. Class: 438/654; 257/E21.303; 257/E21.311; 257/E21.586; 438/672; 438/714; 438/720
Field Of Search:
International Class: H01L 21/44
U.S Patent Documents:
Foreign Patent Documents: 10-2003-0058853; 10-2004-0087406
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U.S. Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 12/332,017, mailed Dec. 30, 2009. cited by applicant.
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Abstract: Top-down methods of increasing reflectivity of tungsten films to form films having high reflectivity, low resistivity and low roughness are provided. The methods involve bulk deposition of tungsten followed by a removing a top portion of the deposited tungsten. In particular embodiments, removing a top portion of the deposited tungsten involve exposing it to a fluorine-containing plasma. The methods produce low resistivity tungsten bulk layers having lower roughness and higher reflectivity. The smooth and highly reflective tungsten layers are easier to photopattern than conventional low resistivity tungsten films. Applications include forming tungsten bit lines.
Claim: What is claimed is:

1. A method of depositing a tungsten layer having a thickness Td on a substrate surface, the method comprising: depositing a layer of tungsten having a thickness Tl directlyon the substrate surface via a chemical vapor deposition reaction between a tungsten-containing precursor and the reducing agent; and removing a top portion of the deposited tungsten layer to form a tungsten bulk layer having thickness Td, wherein Td isless than Ti and wherein no more than the top portion is removed, wherein the top portion is between about 5% and 25% of the thickness Tl of the deposited tungsten layer.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the top portion is between about 5% and 15% of the thickness Tl of the deposited tungsten layer.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the top portion is about 10% of the thickness Tl of the deposited tungsten layer.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein removing the top portion comprises exposing the deposited tungsten layer to atomic fluorine.

5. The method of claim 1, further comprising introducing a fluorine-containing compound to a remote plasma generator upstream of a chamber that houses the substrate, generating atomic fluorine within the remote plasma generator, and flowingatomic fluorine from the remote plasma generator to the chamber to remove the top portion of the deposited tungsten layer.

6. The method of claim 5, wherein the partial pressure of the fluorine-containing compound introduced to the remote plasma generator is at least about 0.7 Torr.

7. The method of claim 5, wherein the partial pressure of the fluorine-containing compound introduced to the remote plasma generator is at least about 1 Torr.

8. The method of claim 5, wherein the fluorine-containing compound is NF3.

9. The method of claim 1, wherein Td is between about 500 .ANG. and 2000 .ANG..

10. The method of claim 1, wherein the reflectivity of the tungsten bulk layer having thickness Td is 15% greater than that of a bare silicon wafer.

11. The method of claim 1, wherein the resistivity of the tungsten bulk layer having thickness Td is less than that of a film of thickness Td deposited by chemical vapor deposition with no subsequent etch operations.

12. The method of claim 11, wherein the reflectivity of the tungsten bulk layer having thickness Td is greater than that of the film of thickness Td deposited by chemical vapor deposition with no subsequent etch operations and the roughness ofthe tungsten bulk layer having thickness Td is less than that of the film of thickness Td deposited by chemical vapor deposition with no subsequent etch operations.

13. The method of claim 1, after removing the top portion, etching the tungsten bulk layer having thickness Td to define one or more features.

14. The method of claim 1, wherein the substrate surface is planar.

15. The method of claim 1, wherein the substrate surface includes one or more raised or recessed features.

16. The method of claim 1, wherein the resistivity of the deposited tungsten bulk layer is less than about 15 micro-ohm-cm.

17. The method of claim 1, wherein removing the top portion comprises exposing the deposited tungsten layer to a direct plasma.

18. The method of claim 1, wherein removing the top portion comprises exposing the deposited tungsten layer to a remotely-generated plasma.

19. The method of claim 1, wherein removing the top portion comprises sputtering the deposited tungsten layer.

20. The method of claim 1, wherein removing the top portion comprises performing chemical mechanical planarization.
Description: FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention relates to methods for preparing tungsten films. Embodiments of the invention are useful for integrated circuit applications that require tungsten films having low electrical resistivity, low roughness and high reflectivity.

BACKGROUND

The deposition of tungsten films using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques is an integral part of many semiconductor fabrication processes. Tungsten films may be used as low resistivity electrical connections in the form of horizontalinterconnects, vias between adjacent metal layers, and contacts between a first metal layer and the devices on the silicon substrate. In a conventional tungsten deposition process, the wafer is heated to the process temperature in a vacuum chamber, andthen a very thin portion of tungsten film, which serves as a seed or nucleation layer, is deposited. Thereafter, the remainder of the tungsten film (the bulk layer) is deposited on the nucleation layer. Conventionally, the tungsten bulk layer is formedby the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF.sub.6) with hydrogen (H.sub.2) on the growing tungsten layer.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

Top-down methods of increasing reflectivity of tungsten films to form films having high reflectivity, low resistivity and low roughness are provided. The methods involve bulk deposition of tungsten followed by a removing a top portion of thedeposited tungsten. In particular embodiments, removing a top portion of the deposited tungsten involve exposing it to a fluorine-containing plasma. The methods produce low resistivity tungsten bulk layers having lower roughness and higherreflectivity. The smooth and highly reflective tungsten layers are easier to photopattern than conventional low resistivity tungsten films. Applications include forming tungsten bit lines.

In certain embodiments, methods of depositing tungsten films involving chemical vapor deposition are provided. The deposited films are etched back, e.g., using a NF3 remote plasma. Tungsten film roughness and reflectivity are improved byetching off sharp tungsten peaks and other non-uniformities that dominate the deposited film surface. Additionally, resistivity is improved over a regularly deposited film of identical final thickness. Unlike previous methods of roughness reduction,which increase resistivity, resistivity and roughness are improved simultaneously in the methods described herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The following detailed description can be more fully understood when considered in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a process flow sheet showing relevant operations of methods according to various embodiments.

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram illustrating the change in tungsten film grain structure after etching according to various embodiments.

FIG. 3 is a graph showing reflectivity as a function of film thicknesses for films formed by an embodiment of the methods described herein as compared to films formed by conventional CVD deposition.

FIG. 4 is a graph showing resistivity as a function of film thicknesses for films formed by an embodiment of the methods described herein as compared to films formed by conventional CVD deposition.

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a processing system suitable for conducting tungsten deposition processes in accordance with embodiments of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a diagram showing components of chamber suitable for carrying out tungsten deposition and etch-back processes in accordance with embodiments of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Introduction

In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the present invention, which pertains to forming thin tungsten films. Modifications, adaptations or variations of specificmethods and structures shown and discussed herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art and are within the scope of this invention.

Embodiments of the present invention involve depositing tungsten layers that have low resistivity and low roughness. In previous processes, resistivity and roughness of tungsten film have been inversely related; lowering resistivity results inincreased roughness and vice-versa. As a result, percentage root mean square (RMS) roughness to film thickness may exceed 10% for low resistivity tungsten films of 500 .ANG. or greater. Lowering the roughness of the film makes subsequent operations,including patterning, easier.

The methods described also provide highly reflective films. Conventional processes for depositing bulk tungsten layers involve hydrogen reduction of tungsten-containing precursors in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The reflectivityof a 1000 .ANG. film that is grown by conventional hydrogen reduction CVD is 110% or less compared to that of a silicon surface. In certain applications, however, tungsten films having greater reflectivity are needed. For example, tungsten filmshaving low reflectivity and high roughness can make photopatterning tungsten, e.g., to form bitlines or other structures, more difficult.

Methods of depositing reflective tungsten films having low resistivity that involve CVD deposition of tungsten in the presence of alternating nitrogen gas pulses are described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/202,126, entitled "MethodFor Reducing Tungsten Roughness And Improving Reflectivity," filed Aug. 29, 2008, and incorporated by reference herein. Other prior techniques for roughness reductions, reflectivity improvement or resistivity reduction involve modifying the processchemistry. In certain applications, however, the addition of nitrogen or other modifications to the process chemistry may be undesirable. For example, step coverage, plugfill degradation and electrical performance degradation due to the presence ofincompatible elements arise from these bottom-up methods. The methods described herein, by contrast, can be used with any deposition chemistry without modification. In certain embodiments, for example, there is no nitrogen exposure during thedeposition.

In certain embodiments, the methods provided herein involve bulk deposition of a tungsten layer via chemical vapor deposition on a substrate followed by an etch-back of a top portion of a deposited bulk layer. The resulting tungsten film hasresistivity comparable to that of a film deposited by conventional large grain tungsten CVD processes, but with much higher reflectivity and lower roughness.

FIG. 1 shows a process according to certain embodiments of the invention. The process begins by depositing a tungsten nucleation layer on a substrate. Block 101. In general, a nucleation layer is a thin conformal layer which serves tofacilitate the subsequent formation of a bulk material thereon. In certain embodiments, the nucleation layer is deposited using a pulsed nucleation layer (PNL) technique. In a PNL technique, pulses of the reducing agent, purge gases, andtungsten-containing precursors are sequentially injected into and purged from the reaction chamber. The process is repeated in a cyclical fashion until the desired thickness is achieved. PNL broadly embodies any cyclical process of sequentially addingreactants for reaction on a semiconductor substrate.

PNL techniques may be used in particular for the deposition of low resistivity films in small features. As features become smaller, the tungsten (W) contact or line resistance increases due to scattering effects in the thinner W film. Whileefficient tungsten deposition processes require tungsten nucleation layers, these layers typically have higher electrical resistivities than the bulk tungsten layers. Low resistivity tungsten films minimize power losses and overheating in integratedcircuit designs. Because the .rho..sub.nucleation>.rho..sub.bulk, the thickness of the nucleation layer should be minimized to keep the total resistance as low as possible. The tungsten nucleation should also be sufficiently thick to fully cover theunderlying substrate to support high quality bulk deposition.

PNL techniques for depositing tungsten nucleation layers that have low resistivity and that support deposition of low resistivity tungsten bulk layers are described in U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 12/030,645, 11/951,236 and 61/061,078,incorporated by reference herein. Additional discussion regarding PNL type processes can be found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,635,965, 6,844,258, 7,005,372 and 7,141,494 as well as in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/265,531, also incorporated herein byreference. In certain embodiments, low resistivity treatment operations are performed during or after the tungsten nucleation layer deposition. The methods described herein are not limited to a particular method of tungsten nucleation layer deposition,but include deposition bulk tungsten film on tungsten nucleation layers formed by any method including PNL, atomic layer deposition (ALD), CVD, and any other method.

Returning to FIG. 1, after the tungsten nucleation layer is deposited, and any desired treatment has been performed, a bulk tungsten layer of thickness Tl is deposited on the nucleation layer. Block 103. Thickness Tl is typically greater thanthe total desired thickness Td to account for the portion of the layer to be removed during the etch operation. In certain embodiments, bulk deposition involves a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in which a tungsten-containing precursor isreduced by hydrogen to deposit tungsten. While tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) is often used, the process may be performed with other tungsten precursors, including, but not limited to, WCl6. In addition, while hydrogen is generally used as the reducingagent in the CVD deposition of the bulk tungsten layer, other reducing agents including silane may be used in addition or instead of hydrogen without departing from the scope of the invention. In another embodiment, W(CO)6 may be used with or without areducing agent. Unlike with the PNL processes described above, in a CVD technique, the WF.sub.6 and H.sub.2 or other reactants are simultaneously introduced into the reaction chamber. This produces a continuous chemical reaction of mix reactant gasesthat continuously forms tungsten film on the substrate surface.

Once a layer having thickness Tl is deposited, the bulk deposition process is halted. Block 105. As discussed further below, Tl is greater than the final desired thickness Td. A top portion of the layer is then removed or etched back. Block107. In certain embodiments, the etching process involves a plasma etch. This may involve introducing activated species (including radicals, ions and/or high energy molecules) from a remote plasma generator. In certain embodiments, the removaloperation involves a fluorine-based plasma etch, e.g., a remote NF3 plasma etch. The extent of the etch-back is discussed further below, though in certain embodiments, about 10% of the layer deposited in operation 103 is removed.

The flow of fluorine activated species (or other species depending on the removal chemistry) is then shut off. Typically, the process is complete at this point if the deposited thickness after etch-back is the desired total thickness. Incertain embodiments, at least one additional deposition-removal cycle is performed to deposit the tungsten layer.

The method described above produces films having higher reflectivity and lower roughness than films deposited by conventional methods having identical thicknesses. For example, in one experiment, reflectivity (as compared to a bare siliconwafer) of a 1940 .ANG. film as deposited was 103%. After exposure to a remote NF3 plasma to remove 200 .ANG., reflectivity was 115%. By contrast, a 1720 .ANG. film deposited by CVD with no etch back had a reflectivity of 106%. Additionally,resistivity of the etch tungsten film is lower than a conventionally deposited film of the same thickness--in certain embodiments, about 20% lower. This is significant because an increase in reflectivity is accompanied by an increase in resistivity inconventional methods.

Typically, low resistivity is achieved by large grain growth, while smoothness and high reflectivity is achieved by using small grain deposition. Tungsten grain growth occurs in lateral and vertical directions. In certain embodiments, themethods described herein involve growing large grain tungsten in a bulk deposition process. After deposition, the vertically-oriented grain growth is selectively etched. After etching, the large laterally-oriented growth remains, providing lowresistivity, while reflectivity is increased and roughness is significantly reduced. This is illustrated in FIG. 2, which shows schematic illustrations of the tungsten layer before (201) and after (203) a fluorine-based remote etched. The layer shownat 203 is about 90% as that shown in 201. Prior to the etch, sharp peaks, such as peak 205, are present. These peaks cause difficulties in subsequent lithographic patterning. After the etch, however, the grain profile is more flat, making the surfacemore reflective.

Not only does the etch process result in a more reflective surface compared to the unetched layer 201 as shown in FIG. 2, but resistivity and roughness are also improved for a film of comparable thickness. FIG. 3 is a graph showing reflectivityfor films of various thicknesses as deposited by a conventional method (CVD deposition to the indicated thickness) and films as deposited by an embodiment of the invention (CVD deposition of 1940 .ANG.+etch back to the indicated thickness). Roughtrendlines 301 and 303 show reflectivity as a function of thickness for conventional deposition and for deposition+etch-back, respectively. As can be seen from the figure, there is a rapid increase in reflectivity, as compared to the conventional layer,from an insignicant portion etched (at 305) to about 200 .ANG. etched. The improvement in reflectivity then flattens out as more film is etched. A maximum impact region (indicated at 307) shows the range of thicknesses removed in the etch operationthat results in greatest improvement in reflectivity. This corresponds to about 10% of the as-deposited film thickness. Thus, in certain embodiments, the final film thickness is between about 75-95%, or more particularly, 80-95% of the as-depositedfilm thickness. Without being bound by a particular theory, it is believed that the maximum impact region etch-back corresponds to the peaks of the as-deposited film being removed. The top-down etch operation selectively removes the peaks because thereis more surface area near the peaks of the as-deposited film. By stopping the etch process before the lower regions are etched, only the peaks are removed, leaving the lateral growth of the grains intact. As indicated, however, resistivity isunexpectedly also found to be lower following the etch process as compared to the same layers prior to etching. Without being bound by a particular theory, it is believed that this unexpected effect may be due to the grain boundaries being less definedafter the etch operation. As discussed further below, in certain embodiments, resistivity is further improved (lowered) by using certain etch operation process conditions.

The removal operation may be any physical or chemical removal operation that can be used to remove a top portion of the as-deposited film. Etch chemistries that may be employed include fluorine-containing etch chemistries, including using xenondifluoride, molecular fluorine and nitrogen trifluoride. Bromine and chlorine-containing compounds, including nitrogen trichloride, molecular chlorine and molecular bromine. In certain embodiments, the etch may be a plasma etch. The plasma may begenerated remotely or in the chamber. In a particular embodiment, NF3 is fed to a remote plasma generator. Activated species, including atomic fluorine, are generated within the remote plasma generator and flowed into the chamber for the chemical etch.

Etchant pressure has been found to affect film resistivity, with higher pressure resulting in lower resistivity. This effect is demonstrated in FIG. 4, which presents a graph showing resistivity of films of various thicknesses. Films depositedusing conventional direct CVD deposition (squares) and films deposited to 1940 .ANG. and etched to the indicated thickness (diamonds). The graph shows the partial pressure of the NF3 as introduced to the remote plasma generator for various thicknessesof films formed by deposition and etching. Curve 401 is a rough trendline showing resistivity as a function of thickness for films deposited using low NF3 partial pressure (0.17 and 0.24 Ton) and curve 403 is a rough trendline of showing resistivity asa function of thickness for films deposited using high NF3 partial pressure (1 Torr). Using high partial pressure results in films having lower resistivity. The improvement in resistivity is also seen comparing data points 405 and 407, representingreflectivity of a conventionally deposited film and a high NF3 etched film, respectively, both films of thickness about 930 .ANG.. The conventionally deposited film has a resistivity of almost 18 micro-ohm-cm, whereas the high NF3 film has a resistivityof less than 16 micro-ohm-cm--a greater than 20% improvement.

In certain embodiments, the partial pressure of the etchant as introduced to a remote plasma generator is above 0.5 Torr, and as high as 80 Torr. In particular embodiments, the partial pressure of the etchant is about 1 Torr as flowed into theremote plasma generator, or deposition chamber.

Comparing the resistivity of the conventionally deposited films to that of etched films of comparable thicknesses (e.g., at about 400 .ANG. and about 900 .ANG.), the resistivity of the etched films is less than that of the conventionallydeposited films. Resistivity improves for both high flow (high partial pressure) etchant as well as low flow (low partial pressure) etchant over conventionally deposited film. This is shown in the table below:

TABLE-US-00001 As- Resistivity as- deposited Final deposited Thickness Thickness (micro-ohm- Final resistivity Process (.ANG.) (.ANG.) cm) (micro-ohm-cm) Conventional 1720 1720 15.5 15.5 Dep -Low 1940 1740 15 15 NF3 Etch Conventional 1350 135017 17 (estimated from trendline) Dep - High 1940 1350 15 14.3 NF3 Etch

With conventional deposition, there is an inverse relationship between resistivity and thickness: resistivity decreases with increasing thickness. Using the methods described herein however, it is possible to obtain low resistivity thin films. This process may be used to deposit thin films having low resistivity, with final thin film thickness ranging according to various embodiments, from 100 .ANG. to 1000 .ANG.. For thin films, the final film thickness may be between 10%-90% of theas-deposited film, i.e., as much as 90% of the as-deposited film may be removed to create the low resistivity thin film.

In addition to chemical etching, the top portion may be removed in certain embodiments by sputtering, e.g., with argon, or by a very soft chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) method such as touch CMP.

In another embodiment, the chamber is simultaneously cleaned while the etch process takes place. By introducing a fluorine-based etchant into the chamber, tungsten deposited on the interior parts of the chamber may be removed while thedeposited tungsten layer is etched. By simultaneously cleaning the chamber while etching, the necessity of independent chamber clean operations is reduced or eliminated.

Experimental

Tungsten films were deposited on tungsten nucleation layers on semiconductor wafers using a conventional hydrogen reduction of WF6 CVD process. Films of 389 .ANG., 937 .ANG., 1739 .ANG. and 1942 .ANG. (center thickness) were deposited. Reflectivity and resistivity were measured for all films.

Tungsten films were deposited on tungsten nucleation layers using a deposition-etch process in accordance with that described in FIG. 1. A hydrogen reduction of WF6 CVD process was used to deposit the films. Deposition conditions were the sameas for the conventionally deposited films. As deposited thickness for all films was about 1940 .ANG. (ranging from 1935 .ANG. to 1947 .ANG.). A remote NF3 plasma was used to etch the films, with etch amounts ranging from 1 .ANG. to 1787 .ANG.,resulting in final thicknesses ranging from 151 .ANG. to 1941 .ANG.. NF3 partial pressure was set at one of the following levels: 0.02 Torr, 0.17 Torr, 0.24 Torr or 1 Torr. Reflectivity and resistivity were measured for all films after etching.

Reflectivity improves by about 10% after etch as compared to conventionally deposited films of comparable thickness. Results of the reflectivity measurements are shown in FIG. 3 and discussed above.

Results of the resistivity measurements are shown in FIG. 4 and discussed above.

Roughness is also improved over the conventionally deposited films. For example, AFM roughness of a 1940 .ANG. film as deposited was 9.7 nm. After NF3 etch of about 20 nm to 1740 .ANG., roughness was reduced by 2.5 nm to 9.2 nm. Roughness ofa conventionally deposited 1720 .ANG. film was 9 nm. Roughness is improved by about 20% over the conventionally deposited films.

Apparatus

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a processing system suitable for conducting tungsten deposition processes in accordance with embodiments of the invention. The system 500 includes a transfer module 503. The transfer module 503 provides a clean,pressurized environment to minimize the risk of contamination of substrates being processed as they are moved between the various reactor modules. Mounted on the transfer module 503 is a multi-station reactor 509 capable of performing PNL deposition andCVD according to embodiments of the invention. Chamber 509 may include multiple stations 511, 513, 515, and 517 that may sequentially perform these operations. For example, chamber 509 could be configured such that station 511 performs PNL deposition,station 713 performs a nucleation layer treatment, and stations 513 and 515 perform CVD and etch operations. Alternatively, the etch operation may be performed in a different station as the CVD deposition. In certain embodiments, the deposition andetch operations may be performed in separate tools.

Also mounted on the transfer module 503 may be one or more single or multi-station modules 507 capable of performing plasma or chemical (non-plasma) pre-cleans. The module may also be used for various other treatments, e.g., post liner tungstennitride treatments. The system 500 also includes one or more (in this case two) wafer source modules 501 where wafers are stored before and after processing. An atmospheric robot (not shown) in the atmospheric transfer chamber 519 first removes wafersfrom the source modules 501 to loadlocks 521. A wafer transfer device (generally a robot arm unit) in the transfer module 503 moves the wafers from loadlocks 521 to and among the modules mounted on the transfer module 503.

FIG. 6 shows a schematic representation of a chamber or station that may be used in an etch operation. The methods of the invention involve introducing an etchant, e.g., fluorine-based etchant into a reactor or chamber 600, having a pedestal608 that supports a wafer on which tungsten is deposited. Atomic fluorine is generated in a remote plasma chamber 630. In operation, a fluorine-containing gas, e.g., NF.sub.3, is introduced to the remote plasma chamber 630 via a valve 632. Atomicfluorine is generated therein. Valve 634 is opened to allow the atomic species to enter the chamber via the showerhead 602. FIG. 6 shows just one example of a remote plasma chamber; other arrangements and configurations may be used. Atomic speciesenter the chamber and etch the tungsten film (not shown) deposited on the wafer as discussed above. (One of skill in the art will understand that other species may be present in the plasma or gases exiting the showerhead into the reactor. For example,the species entering the deposition chamber from the showerhead may include NF.sub.3 and NF.sub.x as well as atomic fluorine. No ions or electrons are present in significant amounts. At higher pressures, NF.sub.3 as well as F.sub.2 is present.) Byappropriately adjusting the pressure, the showerhead acts as a tunable source of the desired atomic and/or molecular fluorine etchant. Note that preceding the etch process, deposition precursors may enter the showerhead to deposit the tungsten film onthe wafer.

Sensors 626 represent gas sensors, pressure sensors etc. that may be used to provide information on reactor conditions. Examples of chamber sensors that may be monitored during the clean include mass flow controllers, pressure sensors such asmanometers, thermocouples located in pedestal, and infra-red detectors to monitor the presence of a gas or gases in the chamber.

As the tungsten is removed from the chamber, tungsten hexafluoride is produced. The tungsten hexafluoride may be sensed by sensors 726, providing an indication of the progress of the etch. The tungsten hexafluoride is removed from the reactorvia an outlet (not shown) such that once the clean is complete, the sensor will sense no tungsten hexafluoride. Sensors 626 may also include a pressure sensor to provide chamber pressure readings.

Molecular fluorine may be supplied to the chamber by methods other than using a remote plasma chamber to generate atomic fluorine and regulating the pressure so that the atomic fluorine combines into molecular fluorine as described above. Forexample, fluorine gas may be allowed into the chamber from a fluorine gas supply. However, in embodiments that employ both atomic and molecular fluorine as described above, the use of the remote plasma chamber provides a simple way to switch betweenstages. Moreover, the remote plasma chamber allows the use of NF.sub.3, which is easier to handle than molecular fluorine, as an inlet gas to the system. Certain embodiments may employ a direct (in-situ) plasma for the generation of atomic fluorine.

In certain embodiments, a system controller 624 is employed to control process conditions during deposition and removal operations. The controller will typically include one or more memory devices and one or more processors. The processor mayinclude a CPU or computer, analog and/or digital input/output connections, stepper motor controller boards, etc.

The controller may control all of the activities of the deposition apparatus. The system controller executes system control software including sets of instructions for controlling the timing, mixture of gases, chamber pressure, chambertemperature, wafer temperature, RF power levels, wafer chuck or pedestal position, and other parameters of a particular process. Other computer programs stored on memory devices associated with the controller may be employed in some embodiments.

Typically there will be a user interface associated with the controller. The user interface may include a display screen, graphical software displays of the apparatus and/or process conditions, and user input devices such as pointing devices,keyboards, touch screens, microphones, etc.

The computer program code for controlling the deposition and removal processes in a process sequence can be written in any conventional computer readable programming language: for example, assembly language, C, C++, Pascal, Fortran or others. Compiled object code or script is executed by the processor to perform the tasks identified in the program.

The controller parameters relate to process conditions such as, for example, process gas composition and flow rates, temperature, pressure, remote plasma conditions such as RF power levels and the low frequency RF frequency, etchant flow ratesor partial pressure, cooling gas pressure, and chamber wall temperature. These parameters are provided to the user in the form of a recipe, and may be entered utilizing the user interface.

Signals for monitoring the process may be provided by analog and/or digital input connections of the system controller. The signals for controlling the process are output on the analog and digital output connections of the deposition apparatus.

The system software may be designed or configured in many different ways. For example, various chamber component subroutines or control objects may be written to control operation of the chamber components necessary to carry out the inventivedeposition processes. Examples of programs or sections of programs for this purpose include substrate positioning code, process gas control code, pressure control code, heater control code, and plasma control code.

A substrate positioning program may include program code for controlling chamber components that are used to load the substrate onto a pedestal or chuck and to control the spacing between the substrate and other parts of the chamber such as agas inlet and/or target. A process gas control program may include code for controlling gas composition and flow rates and optionally for flowing gas into the chamber prior to deposition in order to stabilize the pressure in the chamber. A pressurecontrol program may include code for controlling the pressure in the chamber by regulating, e.g., a throttle valve in the exhaust system of the chamber. A heater control program may include code for controlling the current to a heating unit that is usedto heat the substrate. Alternatively, the heater control program may control delivery of a heat transfer gas such as helium to the wafer chuck. An etchant control program may include code for controlling the etchant flow rate and partial pressure,carrier gas flow rate and partial pressure, etch time, etc.

Examples of chamber sensors that may be monitored during deposition include mass flow controllers, pressure sensors such as manometers, and thermocouples located in pedestal or chuck. Appropriately programmed feedback and control algorithms maybe used with data from these sensors to maintain desired process conditions. Tungsten hexafluoride, or other etching byproduct, may be sensed to provide an indication of how much tungsten has been removed.

The foregoing describes implementation of embodiments of the invention in a single or multi-chamber semiconductor processing tool.

Applications

The present invention may be used to deposit thin, low resistivity tungsten layers for many different applications. One application is for interconnects in integrated circuits such as memory chips and microprocessors. Interconnects are currentlines found on a single metallization layer and are generally long thin flat structures. These may be formed by a blanket deposition of a tungsten layer (by a process as described above), followed by a patterning operation that defines the location ofcurrent carrying tungsten lines and removal of the tungsten from regions outside the tungsten lines.

A primary example of an interconnect application is a bit line in a memory chip. Of course, the invention is not limited to interconnect applications and extends to vias, contacts and other tungsten structures commonly found in electronicdevices.

In certain embodiments wherein the deposition process is used for bit line applications, the final thickness of the tungsten film is between 500 .ANG.-2000 .ANG., with as-deposited film thicknesses between 500 .ANG.-2500 .ANG.. The process mayalso be used to deposit much thicker films if needed. Also as described above, the process may be used to deposit thin films having low resistivity, e.g., films of thickness between 100 .ANG.-1000 .ANG.. In general, the invention finds application inany environment where thin, low-resistivity tungsten layers are required.

Other Embodiments

While this invention has been described in terms of several embodiments, there are alterations, modifications, permutations, and substitute equivalents, which fall within the scope of this invention. It should also be noted that there are manyalternative ways of implementing the methods and apparatuses of the present invention. For example, although the above description describes primarily CVD deposition, the deposition-etch methods may also be employed with other types of tungstendeposition. It is therefore intended that the following appended claims be interpreted as including all such alterations, modifications, permutations, and substitute equivalents as fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.

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