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Multipurpose body-turn-over apparatus










Image Number 6 for United States Patent #6321398.

A multipurpose body-turn-over apparatus mainly including an elevator, a driving mechanism, ropes, a net, suspension fittings, a vibrator, and a controller. The controller sets operating time and speed, and time pause at reverse of the apparatus, and the elevator is adjustable in height. The driving mechanism drives a displacement shaft of the driven assembly to move or rotate, so that ropes hanging from two ends of the driven assembly to connect the net are alternately pulled up and lowered, helping a patient lying on the net to regularly turn over or lie on side to avoid bedsore, or do rehabilitation exercises. The vibrator may alternately pull and lower ropes connected to two sides of the net at high frequency. The apparatus may be designed into heavy-duty or light models to meet different requirements and can be freely moved for use with different sickbeds.








 
 
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