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Hybrid immunoglobulin-thrombolytic enzyme molecules which specifically bind a thrombus, and methods of their production and use










Image Number 12 for United States Patent #5609869.

Hybrid immunoglobulin-enzyme molecules are provided which are composed of antibodies, or derivatives or fragments thereof, which specifically bind an arterial or venous thrombus that are operably linked to the enzymatically active portions of thrombolytic enzymes such as plasminogen activators. In a preferred embodiment the hybrid molecules specifically bind to fibrin and have fibrinolytic activity. The hybrid molecules of the present invention may be produced by any means, including chemical conjugation, or by means of recombinant DNA, genetic engineering and/or hybridoma technology. Methods for making and using the molecules in diagnosis and therapy are also disclosed.








 
 
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